nanny state

NYS H2O is weird

It must be.  It's the only explanation.  And since we're not fracking here, that can't be the reason for the bizarre state of the drinking supply.

Despite being doused by the judge,

Nanny Bloomberg is still busily dashing around, dripping wet, telling everyone what to eat and drink—like most progressives, he seems to suffer from the delusion that he's God—as  well as influencing gun legislation in other states with his megabucks.

And Senator UpChuck Schumer has a surprise in store for legal gun owners, S. 374, the Fix Gun Checks Act of 2013, formerly known as the ridiculously misnamed Protecting Responsible Gun Owners Act of 2013:

...Title II of the S. 374 is a gun controller's wet dream.
 

First, Section 202 makes it illegal for a firearm transfer to be made between unlicensed persons. It would required a licensed importer, manufacturer, or dealer to first take possession of it, enter it in their bound book, perform a NICS check, fill out a Form 4473, and then and only then, complete the transfer....

...Section 203 is equally egregious. It mandates the reporting of lost or stolen firearms within 24 hours of discovery to the "Attorney General and to the appropriate authorities." More importantly, the penalty for knowingly violating this provision is 5 years imprisonment! 

If passed, the law goes into effect in 180 days from passage. So far, it has passed out of the Judiciary Committee on a 10-8 party-line vote.
 

While the gun prohibitionists would like to have bans on standard capacity magazines and semi-automatic firearms with ugly cosmetics, universal background checks is what they really want because the only way to make enforcement of them possible is a national firearms and firearm owners database. As Andy Gross, the former CEO of Intel Corporation, famously said, only the paranoid survive.

Of course, you're not paranoid if they really are after you. Read the whole thing.

What are some of the possible ramifications of Schumer's quietly-snuck-under-the-radar bill?

  • If you left town for more than 7 days, and left your gay partner, or unrelated roommate at home with the guns, you’d be committing a felony. This should be called the “denying gun rights to gays act.” Remember that the federal government does not recognize gay marriage, even if you’re state does, thanks to DOMA. 5 years in prison.
  • Actually, even married couples are questionably legal, because the exemption between family only applies to gifts, not to temporary transfers. The 7 day implication is if you leave your spouse at home for more than 7 days, it’s an unlawful transfer, and you’re a 5 year felon. I suppose you could gift them to your spouse, or related co-habitant, and then have them gift them back when you arrive back home. Maybe the Attorney General will decide to create a form for that.
  • It would be illegal to lend a gun to a friend to take shooting. That would be a transfer. 5 years in federal prison.
  • Steals the livelihood of gun dealers by setting a fixed fee to conduct transfers. The fee is fixed by the Attorney General. What’s to prevent him from setting it at $1000?
  • Enacts defacto universal gun registration, because of record keeping requirements.
  • All lost and stolen guns must be reported to the federal and local government. This means everyone will have to fill out the theft/loss form, and not just FFLs. You only have 24 hours to comply. If you lose a gun on a hunting trip deep in the woods, and can’t get back home to fill out the form in 24 hours, you’re a felon and will spend 5 years in federal prison.
  • Want to lend a gun to a friend to go hunting? It’s a 5 year in prison felony.
  • No exception for state permits. All transfers must go through a dealer or 5 years in federal prison.
  • UPDATE: Teaching someone to shoot on your own land is a felony, 5 years, if you hand them the gun. Not an exempted transfer.

And lastly (for now...there's never an end to it in this state), there are the state legislators—Republicans included—who seem to think that the laws of economics are suspended the moment one crosses the state line into New York.

We live in an

The Cassandra Problem

There's a local prophet(ess)—that's a portrait of her tearing her hair out over there on the right—who wrote the following regarding zoning in Dryden in 2010.  It was based on the (then) Amended Zoning Law, revised draft, of September, 2009:

The scope and control the Town would assume over private property owners goes far beyond health and safety and well into social engineering...
 

...Part of the "character of Dryden" has been that its town government was "minimalist," and apart from providing basic town services, left its residents alone. That is part of the "character" that has made Dryden attractive.  That part of character would be lost as the Town moves into comprehensive socially driven zoning, recreation, and other activities that enlarge Town government...

...this level of planning is unnecessary, adds to New York's passion to overregulate, and will be costly to administer, hence demanding even higher taxes...

...It appears government would like to shape and control how Dryden develops to make its tasks easier and to fit the social mode some residents prefer.  But government is supposed to serve public needs, not direct them...

So, while a lot of time in the last year has been spent arguing back and forth over nitty-gritty details of the new zoning law, the real problem was that the Town's entire approach was—dare we say it so baldly?—just plain wrong.

And, as it's turned out, none of the recent suggested changes that might have made the new law at least somewhat less of an overreach were adopted in the final version that was passed by the town board last week.

Not really surprising.  At this point, we'll don our preferred chapeau

and remind you of where the kind of thinking demonstrated by the Town originates. Watch the PowerPoint presentation—it's still news to many people in Central New York, but will sound distressingly familiar to many others.

Beware, other towns and municipalities...don't say Cassandra didn't warn you:

Nanny State

From the Giz, via Ace:

fireworks map

Didn't I just read somewhere something about confidence in the average free citizen making America absolutely exceptional?

New York is a red state, and I don't mean that in a  good way.

Call Social Services, stat

"The feeling is this is a real trend; the state backing away from its responsibility to take care of its people." — Tompkins County Legislature Chair Martha Robertson, D-Dryden

Spilled milk

Since Richard Hanna is a member of the Congressional Dairy Farmers Caucus, he might find this column by the well-known economist Thomas Sowell, er, interesting (via Weasel Zippers):

Despite the old saying, "Don't cry over spilled milk," the Environmental Protection Agency is doing just that.

We all understand why the EPA was given the power to issue regulations to guard against oil spills, such as that of the Exxon Valdez in Alaska or the more recent BP oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. But not everyone understands that any power given to any bureaucracy for any purpose can be stretched far beyond that purpose.

In a classic example of this process, the EPA has decided that, since milk contains oil, it has the authority to force farmers to comply with new regulations to file "emergency management" plans to show how they will cope with spilled milk, how farmers will train "first responders" and build "containment facilities" if there is a flood of spilled milk.

Since there is no free lunch, all of this is going to cost the farmers both money and time that could be going into farming-- and is likely to end up costing consumers higher prices for farm products.

Read the whole thing.  Micromanagement, anyone?

"Morning after pill" for minors being considered in the Assembly Health Committee today

THE  PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK, REPRESENTED IN SENATE AND ASSEMBLY, DO ENACT AS FOLLOWS:

  1    Section 1. Short title. This act shall be known and may  be  cited  as

  2  the "unintended pregnancy prevention act".

  3    S  2.  Legislative  findings. The United States Food and Drug Adminis-

  4  tration (FDA) has declared emergency contraceptive pills to be safe  and

  5  effective in preventing pregnancy when used within 72 hours after unpro-

  6  tected  intercourse. The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecolo-

  7  gists and the American College of Nurse-Midwives  state  that  emergency

  8  contraception  (EC)  is  so  safe, and using it quickly is so important,

  9  that it should be available over the counter,  without  a  prescription.

10  They also emphasize the need for unimpeded access to EC for all women of

11  reproductive  age.  However,  although  there  are no medical reasons to

12  limit provision of EC, the FDA only approved non-prescription access for

13  women 18 years and older....

The complete text of the bill as well as other info may be found here.

(h/t Jim & Tom)

Yet more nanny-statism from one (only one?) of our esteemed US Senators

Sheesh.

Over at JammieWearingFool:

Important News: Schumer Takes on Restocking Fees

You would think a prominent United States Senator has better things to do with his time. But we're talking about the obnoxious gadfly Charles Schumer, who cannot possibly let a Sunday go by without nattering about something as insignificant as fees charged by retailers to people who return items....

The rest is here

Surely, the law of unintended consequences would never apply in this instance...would it?

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