Declaration of Independence

Brushfires of freedom

That is not a concept that Boston Brewing Company has.

I was reminded of this whilst buying a six-pack of Saranac Shandy yesterday (as the cashier remarked: "Beer and lemonade...what could be bad?), and thought to share it while it's still July—or Independence Month, as I like to think of it.

There was a time when I would have been buying Sam Adams Shandy. Not any more.

Here's the relevant part of the transcript of Boston Brewing's "Independence" ad. What's missing (besides the video of the ad itself, which was conveniently removed from You Tube)?

Why name a beer after Samuel Adams? Because Samuel Adams signed the Declaration of Independence. He believed that there was a better way to live. ‘All men are created equal, they are endowed with certain unalienable rights: life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness….’

Oh, yeah...men are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable rights.

Whatever possessed the Boston Brewing Company to edit the Declaration of Independence (that irrelevant founding document signed by, you know, Samuel Adams and 55 more old white guys) in an Independence Day ad? They were just following orders:

The Beer Institute Advertising Code says, “Beer advertising and marketing materials should not include religion or religious themes.”

Well, that settles it then.

And while there may not be a lot of overlap in customer base between Sam Adams beers and Hobby Lobby (with some exceptions  wink), this customer wonders how it is that Hobby Lobby can push back successfully against the monolith that is Obamacare, but Boston Brewing can't bring itself to fight back against...the Beer Institute.

But but but the ad ends with this statement: "We bow to no kings." Right.

Samuel Adams must be spinning.

Taking a constitutional

Judging from e-mails going by the past few days, several people in the area are working out by participating in Hillsdale College's online Constitution 101 course. The Constitution never goes out of style but the course is particularly timely; Hillsdale President Larry Arnn points out that we as a nation really are at a fork in the road...we're going to have to choose between a constitutional model of government (limited, representative, with separation of powers and checks and balances) and what Arnn calls a bureaucratic model (in which agencies run by "experts" combine all three branches of government and operate without oversight).  Calling the latter model "bureaucratic," though, sounds almost innocuous. It's really much more insidious than that.

But some people understood Obamacare as a a chilling manifestation of Arnn's bureaucratic model even before there was an Obamacare.  We were warned (via New Zeal):

Arnn also points out that the Constitution and the Declaration of Independence are inextricably linked, an idea that the often-maligned (by progressives, anyway) Calvin Coolidge understood:

...If all men are created equal, that is final. If they are endowed with inalienable rights, that is final. If governments derive their just powers from the consent of the governed, that is final. No advance, no progress can be made beyond these propositions. If anyone wishes to deny their truth or their soundness, the only direction in which he can proceed historically is not forward, but backward toward the time when there was no equality, no rights of the individual, no rule of the people...

You can still register for "Constitution 101" at Hillsdale.  It's free.
 

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